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2006-2008

National Cancer Institute Factsheet on Cellular Telephone Use and Cancer Risk

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September 2008

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The National Cancer Institute coordinates the National Cancer Program, which conducts and supports research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to the cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer, rehabilitation from cancer, and the continuing care of cancer patients and the families of cancer patients.

The NCI factsheet makes the following summary as one of its key points: "Studies have not shown any consistent link between cellular telephone use and cancer, but scientists feel that additional research is needed before firm conclusions can be drawn."

The factsheet can be found at: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/cellphones

 

Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) - Position Statement on the Possible Harmful Biological Effects of Low-Level Electromagnetic Fields of Frequencies up to 300 GHz

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May 2008

The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) acts as a voice for the engineering and technology professions by providing independent, reliable and factual information to the public and policy makers. The Position Statement aims to provide an accessible guide to the findings of the IET’s Biological Effects Policy Advisory Group on low-level electromagnetic fields (BEPAG) expert group. This position statement encapsulates the IET’s position on the possible harmful biological effects of low-level electromagnetic fields of frequencies up to 300 GHz.

The IEC's Position Statement states: "BEPAG has concluded that the balance of scientific evidence to date still does not indicate that harmful effects occur in humans due to low-level exposure to EMFs. This conclusion remains the same as that reached in its previous position statements, the last being in May 2006, and has not been substantially altered by the peer-reviewed literature published in the past two years."

 

Swedish Radiation Protection Authority’s Independent Expert Group's Report on Electromagnetic Fields

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March 2008

This is the fifth annual report from the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority’s (SSI) Independent Expert Group (IEG) on Electromagnetic Fields and focuses on recent research on mobile phone telephony and health risks.The report, which covers 2007, is divided into four different frequency fields, static, extremely low, intermediate and radio frequency fields.

The key issue of exposure from base stations again states: "The few studies that have been published on health risks among populations living near transmitters have had major methodological shortcomings. However, the exposure to the general population that results from transmitters is very weak and one would not expect such exposure to produce a health risk as discussed in the previous report. Indeed, one would assume that if RF exposure at low levels is associated with a health risk it would be considerably easier to detect it in studies of mobile phone users, or highly exposed occupational groups. The overall conclusion is that exposure from transmitters is unlikely to be a health risk"(p54)

The full report can be found at:
http://www.stralsakerhetsmyndigheten.se/Global/Publikationer/Rapport/Stralskydd/2008/ssi-rapp-2008-12.pdf

 

UK Mobile Telecommunications and Health Research (MTHR) Programme Progress Report by the Programme Management Committee

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September 2007

This report describes the progress of the MTHR programme which was established in 2001 on the recommendation of the Independent Expert Group on Mobile Phones (Stewart Committee). The overall conclusion of the report is that, “None of the research supported by the Programme and published so far demonstrates that biological or adverse health effects are produced by radiofrequency exposure from mobile phones."

The full report can be found at: http://www.mthr.org.uk/documents/MTHR_report_2007.pdf

 

Royal Society of Canada's (RSC) Expert Panel on Potential Health Risks of Radiofrequency Fields from Wireless Telecommunication Devices

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June 2007

This update report by the RSC Canadian Expert Panel sets out advances in research on radio frequency fields and health for the period 2001-2003. The report is a follow up to the panel's original 1999 publication and an update published in 2001.

The full report can be found at: http://www.rsc.ca//files/publications/expert_panels/RF//expert_panel_radiofrequency_update2.pdf

 

The Swiss Research Foundation on Mobile Communications Annual Report 2006

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June 2007

The Swiss Research Foundation, located in Zurich, is a non-profit foundation. Its aims are: to promote innovative research about opportunities and risks associated with mobile communication, to publish research results in scientific journals, to collate and disseminate scientific insights to the public at large, and to improve communication among stakeholders. This report provides information about the activities of the Foundation in 2006 and in particular provides details of the research projects that it funded.

The full report can be found at: http://www.mobile-research.ethz.ch/var/jb2006.pdf

 

The European Commission's Scientific Committee on Emerging & Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR) Report on Possible Effects of Electromagnetic (EMF) on Human Health

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March 2007

SCENIHR's role is to advise the European Commission on questions concerning emerging or newly-identified risks and on broad, complex or multidisciplinary issues requiring a comprehensive assessment of risks to consumer safety or public health and related issues not covered by other Community risk - assessment bodies. One of the conclusions from the report is that: "no health effect has been consistently demonstrated at exposure levels below existing exposure guidelines for the general public. However, data on long term exposure and intracranial tumours are still sparse and in particular for acoustic neuroma some data indicate that an association with RF fields from mobile telephony is possible. For diseases other than cancer, very little epidemiologic data are available."

The full report can be found at: http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_risk/committees/04_scenihr/docs/scenihr_o_007.pdf

Text sourced from the SCENIHR report has been used to answer questions from non-experts. See http://ec.europa.eu/health/opinions2/en/electromagnetic-fields/index.htm

 

Irish Government's Expert Group on Health Effects of Electromagnetic Fields

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March 2007

This report was compiled by a group of experts on electromagnetic fields (EMF). The Expert Group was established and funded by the Department of Communications, Marine and Natural Resources with the following terms of reference:

1) The Expert Group will focus on issues of public exposure, rather than examining occupational exposure.
2) The report produced by the Expert Group will be aimed at Government and the public, rather than the scientific community.
3) The Expert Group will consult with Industry, recognised national and international experts and the wider community in order to complete its report.
4) In future, the Expert Group may be requested to take part in some ongoing monitoring; in order to update the Irish Government's position in light of new scientific publications or reports.
The conclusions of the Expert Group are consistent withy those of similar reviews conducted by authoritative national and international agencies

The full report can be found at http://www.dcmnr.gov.ie/NR/rdonlyres/9E29937F-1A27-4A16-A8C3-F403A623300C/0/ElectromagneticReport.pdf

 

Swedish Radiation Protection Authority’s Independent Expert Group's Report on Electromagnetic Fields

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March 2007

This is the fourth annual report from the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority’s (SSI) Independent Expert Group (IEG) on Electromagnetic Fields and focuses on recent research on mobile phone telephony and health risks.

An update on the key issue of exposure from base stations states: "The few studies that have been published on health risks among populations living near transmitters have had major methodological shortcomings [IEGEMF 2003; IEGEMF 2005; IEGEMF 2006 (current report)]. However, the exposure to the general population that results from transmitters is very weak and one would not expect such exposure to produce a health risk as discussed in the previous report [IEGEMF 2003]. Indeed, one would assume that if RF exposure at low levels is associated with a health risk it would be considerably easier to detect it in studies of mobile phone users, or highly exposed occupational groups. The overall conclusion is that exposure from transmitters is unlikely to be a health risk." (p35/36)

The full report can be found at http://www.stralsakerhetsmyndigheten.se/Global/Publikationer/Rapport/Stralskydd/2007/ssi-rapp-2007-04.pdf

 

Health Council of the Netherlands Electromagnetic Fields Annual Update 2006

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February 2007

(English version begins on page 53)

On 6 March 2000 the President of the Council therefore set up the Electromagnetic Fields Committee. The Committee was initially established for a period of four years, but its mandate has subsequently been extended by two years at a time and currently runs to the end of 2007. The task of the the Committee is to regularly report on scientific developments in the area of electromagnetic fields, as it does in this Annual Update 2006.

This Annual Update deals with two subjects: UMTS and DECT. It is the fourth time that that the Committee uses this format to report on important scientific developments in this way. Previous Annual Updates were published in May 2001, January 2004 and November 2005.

The report's conclusions include: No effect on well-being and cognitive functions, experimental studies do not show effects with short-term exposure and normal use of DECT does not lead to exceeding of exposure limits.

The report can be found at http://www.gezondheidsraad.nl/en/publications/electromagnetic-fields-annual-update-2006

 

WHO Factsheet Electromagnetic Fields and Public Health Base Stations and Wireless Technologies

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May 2006

The World Health Organisation has published a new fact sheet, which provides further information on and summaries of health concerns, protection standards, public perceptions of risk and WHO initiatives.

The Fact Sheet concludes: "Considering the very low exposure levels and research results collected to date, there is no convincing scientific evidence that the weak RF signals from base stations and wireless networks cause adverse health effects."

The fact sheet can be found at www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs304/en/index.html

 

Institute of Engineering and Technology - Position Statement on the Possible Health Effects of Mobile Phones & Electricity Distribution

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May 2006

The Institution of Engineering and Technology – the “IET” (formerly the Institution of Electrical Engineers – the IEE) Biological Effects Policy Advisory Group on Low-level Electromagnetic Fields (the “Group”) has concluded that the balance of scientific evidence to date does not indicate that harmful effects occur in humans due to low-level exposure to electromagnetic fields (“EMF”). This conclusion remains the same as that reached in its previous position statements, the last being in May 2004, and has not been substantially challenged by the peer-reviewed literature published in the past two years.

 

No Established Adverse Health Effects

Mobile phones operate by using radio waves, a form of non-ionising radiation. There is a large body of scientific evidence on the effects of exposure to radio waves because they have been widely used for decades: for example, radio, TV and radar signals are radio waves. The scientific consensus is that, apart from the increased risk of a road accident due to mobile phone use when driving, there is no clear evidence of adverse health effects from the use of mobile phones or from phone masts. (Source: Health Protection Agency, Health Advice on Mobile Phones, May 2010).

A Wealth of Research

A large number of studies have been performed over the last two decades to assess whether mobile phones pose a potential health risk. To date, no adverse health effects have been established as being caused by mobile phone use. (Source: World Health Organisation Fact Sheet N°193, June 2011).